Thursday, May 23, 2024

Fever Headache Nausea Chills Fatigue

Must Read

What Is A Headache With A Sore Throat

Fever, Headache and Chills (Medical Symptom)

Most people get headaches many times during their lives. A headache causes pain in your head or face. The pain may be throbbing, sharp or dull.

A sore throat is pain or irritation in your throat. It might feel scratchy, painful or dry. It often hurts more when you swallow.

Sometimes, you have both a headache and sore throat. Most often, an infection causes those symptoms to happen together.

Healthwhy Early Coronavirus Cases May Have Been Missed

Since that report, other symptoms related to COVID-19 have emerged.

Many patients who’ve either tested positive for the coronavirus, or have been told by their physicians to assume they have it, also develop a headache and sore throat. Others become sick to their stomach with nausea or diarrhea.

Some patients say they have no interest in eating. Many report they’re losing their senses of taste and smell, the British Rhinological Society said recently.

Just this week, a small study published in JAMA Ophthalmology added another potential COVID-19 warning sign: pink eye, also known as conjunctivitis. A third of the 38 patients in the report had the inflammatory eye condition.

But it’s also becoming more clear that some infected people spreading the virus don’t have any symptoms at all.

When Adults Should Seek Emergency Care

According to the , adults should seek immediate emergency treatment if they experience any of the following symptoms:

  • difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • chest or abdomen pain or pressure
  • dizziness that is sudden or severe
  • fainting
  • vomiting that is severe or constant
  • symptoms that disappear and then reappear with a worsened cough and fever

You May Like: What Causes Stiff Joints And Fatigue

When To Seek Emergency Medical Attention

Look for emergency warning signs* for COVID-19. If someone is showing any of these signs, seek emergency medical care immediately:

  • Trouble breathing
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion
  • Inability to wake or stay awake
  • Pale, gray, or blue-colored skin, lips, or nail beds, depending on skin tone

*This list is not all possible symptoms. Please call your medical provider for any other symptoms that are severe or concerning to you.

Can I Prevent A Sore Throat And Headache

Is It a Cold or the Flu?

The best way to prevent sore throat and headache is to avoid infections and illness. Tips include:

  • Wash hands often: Always wash hands after going to the bathroom or changing a diaper and before eating or preparing food.
  • Dont share: Dont share food, water bottles, glasses or other eating utensils.
  • Use good cough hygiene: When coughing or sneezing, use a tissue. If you dont have a tissue, use the crook of your elbow. Dont cough or sneeze into your hand.
  • Stay home if youre sick: Isolate yourself as much as you can until you feel better. And be around other people who are not feeling well.
  • Avoid allergy triggers: Take precautions to avoid your allergy triggers. Allergies can cause coughing and sneezing.
  • Practice safe sex: Use a condom or dental dam to avoid sexually transmitted infections.
  • Avoid tobacco and alcohol products: Try to stay away from cigarettes and limit alcohol. These products increase your risk of developing head and neck cancers.

You May Like: Best Energy Supplements For Chronic Fatigue

What Are The Symptoms Of Sore Throat And Headache

When you have a sore throat, you may have:

  • Pain or scratchiness in your throat.
  • Pain thats worse when you speak or swallow.
  • Hoarse voice.
  • Swollen lymph nodes in the neck .
  • Red or swollen tonsils with white spots on them.

Your headache symptoms may include pain that:

  • Comes on slowly.
  • Feels dull and aching.
  • Affects both sides of your head.

Its also not unusual to have fatigue with sore throat and headache. Fatigue, chills and muscle aches are all symptoms of viral and bacterial infections.

How To Care For Yourself

Medications used to treat the flu or a cold control symptoms. Antibiotics wont work they combat bacterial, not viral, infections. Viruses actually hide inside your own cells where antibiotics cannot affect them. Flu and cold care is aimed at symptom relief and immune system support. These include the following:

  • Get plenty of rest.
  • Do not smoke.
  • Drink plenty of fluidsup to 3-4 liters per day .
  • For fever, headache, body aches, or sore throat pain, take Tylenol Advil , or Aleve every 4-6 hours.
  • For sore throat, gargle every 4 hours with warm, salty water . Also, try using throat lozenges containing a numbing medication.
  • For hoarseness or laryngitis, talk as little as possible. Straining the voice can prolong or worsen laryngitis.
  • For heavy amounts of nasal discharge or a large amount of phlegm associated with cough, consider using a mucolytic, such as Mucinex .
  • For persistent runny nose or nasal congestion, antihistamines and decongestants may be used. Mild antihistamines such as Chlor-Trimeton are useful for runny nose, sneezing and watery eyes. Use a decongestant such as Sudafed for nasal/sinus congestion or ear fullness. A combination antihistamine/decongestant such as Actifed or Dimetapp may be taken for multiple symptoms. But remember, antihistamines may make you drowsy !
  • Read this flu information for more guidance.

Don’t Miss: Can Mild Sleep Apnea Cause Fatigue

Are Chills Serious Shivering And Goose Bumps Can Accompany A Wide Range Of Conditions From A Too

Maintaining our core temperature is one of the bodys most basic functions, and when that temperature is off or when our body thinks its off we get the chills.

Chills occur when the muscles contract and relax in order to make heat, says Rose Taroyan, MD, MPH, a family medicine physician at Keck Medicine of USC and clinical assistant professor of family medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC. This occurs when you are cold, but it can also be your bodys defense mechanism in fighting an infection.

Everyone knows the sensation of getting the chills when your environment is too cold. Thats usually a signal to put on more layers or turn up the heat. But there are many underlying medical conditions that can cause them, too. Read on for some common and not so common causes of chills.

You Have Low Blood Sugar

Fever, Nausea and Chills (Medical Symptom)

Although many people feel a bit shaky and irritable when they need to eat, true hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, most often occurs in people who have diabetes.

One of the symptoms of hypoglycemia is a feeling of shakiness, which may mimic chills, Taroyan says. Hypoglycemia requires immediate treatment to get blood sugar levels back to normal.

Defined as blood glucose of less than 70 milligrams per deciliter, hypoglycemia can cause a variety of other symptoms, including sweating, confusion, a rapid heartbeat, blurry vision, lightheadedness and drowsiness.

If you have diabetes and you notice these symptoms, follow the 15-15 rule: Have 15 grams of simple carbs, such as a glucose tablet, juice, honey or hard candy, and check your blood glucose again in 15 minutes. Then eat a meal, but dont overeat, or your blood sugar will spike.

Also Check: Extreme Fatigue And Neck Pain

You Have A Viral Or Bacterial Infection

When chills are accompanied by other symptoms, such as fever, body aches or fatigue, theyre more likely associated with a systemic infection, such as flu or pneumonia.

Chills boost your bodys core temperature when your immune system attempts to fight off infection, Taroyan explains. Your body temperature increases, even though you might feel cold. If you have a viral infection, you will usually notice other symptoms along with chills, such as sore throat, cough, headache, fatigue and muscle aches. Most of the time, it can be self-limiting and will resolve within 2 weeks. Its important to get plenty of rest and increase your fluid intake.

Home Remedies For Fatigue

The following home remedies may help reduce fatigue:

  • eating smaller meals and healthful snacks every 34 hours
  • gradually decreasing caffeine intake over the course of 3 weeks
  • limiting alcohol intake and avoiding alcohol before bedtime
  • drinking more water to prevent dehydration and associated fatigue
  • gradually increasing physical activity

Don’t Miss: Anti Static Anti Fatigue Mats

The Link Between Headaches And Nausea

In many cases, nausea and headaches result from lifestyle and dietary choices and underlying health conditions. Common among them are:

  • Dehydration:Not drinking enough water causes headaches and is associated with migraines. The daily recommendation for adults is about a half gallon of fluids.
  • Low blood sugar:Skipping meals or not eating enough can cause levels of sugar in the blood to drop considerably, leading to headaches and nausea. Low blood sugar is also known as hypoglycemia.
  • Alcohol use:Drinking alcohol can lead to dehydration as well as fluctuations in blood sugar. These occurrences cause the headaches and nausea associated with hangovers. Alcohol may also trigger migraines.
  • Medication side effects: Many prescribed and over-the-counter medications can cause these symptoms as side effects, so its important to know what youre taking. Notably, using too many pain-managing medications can cause headaches, a condition known as medication overuse headache .
  • Caffeine intake:If youre a regular coffee or tea drinker, you can develop headaches and nausea if you dont get your regular cup. Interestingly, caffeine influences the activity of blood vessels in the brain and can serve both as a headache trigger and a means of relief.
  • Nicotine use: Among the numerous negative health effects of nicotine and smoking tobacco is headache. Smoking increases pain sensitivity and narrows blood vessels, hindering blood flow to the brain.

When To Call Your Doctor Or Head To The Er If You Have Body Aches And Chills

Headache Chills

When we do need to be concerned here is more about the fever range and accompanying symptoms. Call your doctor if:

  • Temperature > 100.4 F rectally in our babes < 3 months old
  • Temperature > 102 F in our kiddos > 3 months old to 2 years old
  • Temperature > 103 F in ourselves or our kiddos > 2 years old
  • Fever present > 3 days
  • You or your kiddo are lethargic
  • You or your kiddo are dehydrated
  • Shivering or shaking chills carry on past 30 minutes
  • Fever is accompanied by other symptoms that concern you

You May Like: Can Low Blood Pressure Cause Fatigue

Chills Fever Headache And Muscle Weakness

Reviewed on 8/30/2021

Headache and muscle aches and pains are often signs that accompany infections that produce fever and chills. It is possible to feel weak and tired when you are experiencing symptoms of an infection. If you believe that you have symptoms of an infection, discussed them with a health care practitioner so that you can receive proper treatment.

While the list below can be considered as a guide to educate yourself about these conditions, this is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a health care provider. There are many other medical conditions that also can be associated with your symptoms and signs. Here are a number of those from MedicineNet:

Could My Symptoms Be Covid

Feeling out of breath with activity

Nausea and vomiting

Feeling out of breath with activity

Nausea and vomiting

Out of breath with activity

Nausea and vomiting

Loss of taste or smell

Sore throat

Severe shortness of breath at rest

Dry cough

Severe muscle and joint pain

Feeling out of breath with activity

Rashes

Blisters on toes and fingers

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste or smell

Sore throat

Severe shortness of breath at rest

Tightness in chest

Feeling out of breath with activity

Palpitations, chest pain

Blisters on toes and fingers

Severe muscle and joint pain

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste or smell

Sore throat

Shortness of breath at rest

Tightness in chest

Out of breath with activity

Palpitations, chest pain

Severe muscle and joint pain

Blisters on toes and fingers

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste and smell

Sore throat

Shortness of breath at rest

Tightness in chest

Out of breath with activity

Palpitations, chest pain

Severe muscle and joint pain

Blisters on toes and fingers

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste and smell

Sore throat

Severe shortness of breath at rest

Tightness in chest

Feeling out of breath with activity

Palpitations, chest pain

Blisters on toes and fingers

Severe muscle and joint pain

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste and smell

Sore throat

Severe shortness of breath at rest

Dry cough

Severe muscle and joint pain

Feeling out of breath with activity

Rashes

Blisters on toes and fingers

Chills and body aches

Loss of taste and smell

Sore throat

Recommended Reading: How To Battle Extreme Fatigue

How To Get Rid Of Body Aches And Chills

  • If you or your babe are really uncomfortable with the chills or achiness, you may take an over-the-counter medication to bring the fever down to a more comfortable range.
  • Dehydration adds to the overall achiness, so amp up those fluids.
  • Rest! Let your body fight for you while you reap the benefits of extra sleep.
  • Take a warm bath to soothe your sore muscles. If youâre running a fever, make sure the water isnât too hot â we donât want to make the fever worse.

What Causes Body Aches

Warning Signs: Seasonal Flu

I know youâre not in a particularly grateful mood, but first letâs thank your body for doing everything it can to protect you! That crummy feeling means our immune system is actually sending out white blood cells to fight an infection, and that is why we feel so stiff and achy. Our body has gone to war!

Along with a possible fever, you may also experience a sore throat and body aches, fatigue, headaches, nausea, stomach aches â these are all possible with a brewing virus and hopefully our body does its job and wins this battle.

Also Check: How To Beat Extreme Fatigue

Chills Diarrhea Fatigue And Nausea Or Vomiting

Reviewed on 7/13/2021

All of these symptoms can be present with a variety of infections, including gastroenteritis. Chills frequently accompany fever and other symptoms. Fatigue is a nonspecific symptom that is present in many different medical conditions. If you are experiencing these or other worrisome symptoms that do not improve or become worse, seek the advice of a healthcare provider.

While the list below can be considered as a guide to educate yourself about these conditions, this is not a substitute for a diagnosis from a health care provider. There are many other medical conditions that also can be associated with your symptoms and signs. Here are a number of those from MedicineNet:

Whats The Outlook For People With Sore Throat And Headache

A sore throat and headache can usually go away within a week. Most of the time, you wont need medical treatment. There are usually no long-term complications.

If you do have strep throat, make sure to take the full course of antibiotics. These drugs treat the infection and prevent complications, including rheumatic fever.

Recommended Reading: Leg Pain Shortness Of Breath Fatigue

Reduce The Risk Of Illness

So, youve decided you want to avoid all of the above.

How do you protect yourself from COVID-19?

  • Wear a face mask when you go out in public
  • Wash your hands often with soap and clean, running water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If you dont have access to soap and water, use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer often. Make sure it has at least 60% alcohol.
  • Dont touch your eyes, nose, or mouth unless you have clean hands.
  • As much as possible, dont touch high-touch public surfaces such as doorknobs. Dont shake hands.
  • Clean home and work surfaces often with disinfectant.
  • Cough or sneeze into a tissue, then throw the tissue into the trash. If you dont have tissues, cough or sneeze into the bend of your elbow.
  • Stay away from people who are sick.
  • Stay informed about COVID-19 in your area. Follow local instructions about being in public. Be aware of events in your community that may be postponed or canceled, such as school and sporting events. You may be advised to not attend public gatherings and to stay about 6 feet from others as much as possible. This is called social distancing.
  • Check your home supplies. Consider keeping a 2-week supply of medicines, food, and other needed household items.
  • Dont share eating or drinking utensils with sick people.
  • Clean surfaces often with disinfectant.

How do you prevent the common cold?

And how do you prevent the flu?

And what about allergies?

Theres not much to do to prevent allergies, but you can help prevent the symptoms by:

When To Seek Medical Advice

COVID

You should contact your GP if you think you or your child has glandular fever, or has a sore throat that is not settling .

They can provide advice and support to help you control your symptoms and reduce the risk of passing the infection on to others.

You should go to your nearest emergency department or dial 999 for an ambulance if you have glandular fever and you develop a rasping breath , have any difficultybreathing or develop a severe abdominal pain.

You should see your GP or call the GP out of hours service if:

  • difficulty swallowing fluids is making you dehydrated
  • you have abdominal pain
  • you become very unwell

These symptoms can be a sign of a complication of glandular fever that may need to be treated in hospital.

Recommended Reading: Can Dry Eyes Cause Fatigue

When To Seek Medical Care

Flu and colds may lead to secondary bacterial infections or worsening of chronic conditions such as asthma for which prescription medication would be necessary. You should seek medical attention if you are not improving after 7-10 days or for any of the following symptoms:

  • Very sore throat that shows no signs of improving after 3 days, or that is accompanied by fever and without any other usual cold symptoms
  • Painful swelling of the lymph nodes or glands in the neck
  • Discolored mucus from nasal passages for more than 7-10 days
  • Pain or tenderness around the eyes
  • Ear pain
  • Cough with production of a large amount of discolored mucus
  • Painful breathing, wheezing or shortness of breath
  • Cough that persists more than 2-3 weeks
  • Severe headaches or facial pain not relieved with over-the-counter medication
  • Fever higher than 100.4 degrees for more than 3-4 days

More articles

Popular Articles